Free Places To Visit In London

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Top London Days Out provides details of free things to do in London.

For London visitors wondering what to do in London we have many suggestions for cheap London sightseeing and places to visit in London.

The majority of London attractions listed are free to visit and include London art galleries, London Zoos (petting), London events, London museums, London parks, the Royal Parks and many other London attractions.

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The history of London dates back over 2,000 years, so with such a long and impressive history it should be no surprise that the City of London is full of significant historic places.

The City has survived war, fire and disease and when you are out and about, you can see sites that were important in each case, whilst being able to track London's history from humble beginnings as a settlement not much larger than Hyde Park, to one of the world's most important commercial, economic and cultural centres.


A section of the Roman London Wall built around AD200 adjoining the Tower of London.


There has been a dock yard on this site for over 1000 years. It is now used by luxury yachts and historic barges.


The museum is the house of the 19th century architect, Sir John Soanes who was responsible for the design of the building.


One of the most famous sites in London, this twin bascule bridge was built in 1892.


A section of the Roman London Wall built around AD200 adjoining the Tower of London.


Local Nature Reserve offering a circular route through woodland and meadows.


The Changing of the Guard happens here everyday in the summer at 11am (10am on Sundays) - on alternate days in the winter.


The Kings Stone or Coronation Stone is an ancient stone block used in ancient times as the site of coronation for Anglo-Saxon kings. Kings said to be coronated here are Aethelstan in 925, Eadred in 946, Aethelred the Unready in 979.


The current building was built in 1907 but there has been a court on the site since medieval times.


Lesnes Wood offers a variety of habitats including woodlands, heathland and ornamental gardens as well as the ruins of Lesnes Abbey.


This 17th century house that was originally home to Henrietta Maria, the queen of Charles I. It is now home to the fine art collection of the Royal Naval Museum.


Since the middle of the 19th Century this has been the place for people to speak out and for people to listen to them.


This famous London landmark was closed in 1983 and is now protected by Grade 2 listing by English Heritage.


A local history museum located in a grade 1 listed 16th century manor house in 20 acres of parkland.


Petticoat Lane is one of Londons oldest markets and has been running since the 1750s.


A lovely Victorian cemetery that is overgrown in parts while other areas have been restored.


A 17th Century house with beautiful grounds.


Unveiled on 18 September 2005 this is a memorial to British forces who took part in the Battle of Britain.


Unmissable museum of the natural world for the young and old alike. There are millions of exhibits including the massive diplodocus cast in the central hall.


The original Cenotaph was a temporary structure erected after the conclusion of the first world war but such was the public feeling for the monument it was replaced by a permenant memorial.


An obelisk and sphinx statues brought from Egypt in 1878 to commemorate the defeat of Napoleon Bonaparte.


Designed by Sir Christopher Wren, St Pauls Cathedral is one of the best know buildings in London. It was built after the great fire of London and is at least the fourth Cathedral to stand on this site.


One of the oldest churches in London, it was destroyed by the Great Fire of London in 1666 and rebuilt, the new design being by Sir Christopher Wren.


Pretty park with an interesting Victorian memorial to commemorate those who died saving others.


The art collection of the City of London Corporation, set in the historic Guildhall Square.


The London Stone is a fragment of a much larger structure from the Medieval period, having been a tourist attraction during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I.


A gothic building containing the Court of Appeal and the High Court.


One of the Royal Parks, planted with avenues of trees and ornamental flower beds.


Part of the Lee Valley Regional Park, Three Mills is a conservation area with historic mills and a playground on the Green. There is an information centre in Millar House.


This is a Grade I listed 18th century house, open to the public as a museum and gallery.


A three storey Jacobean Manor House, built in 1623 and situated in parkland.


A fascinating mill that was built as a traditional windmill in 1816 but converted to run on steam in 1902. It has recently been restored.


In 1854 a severe outbreak of cholera occurred in Soho. The disease, which was previously thought to be air-borne, was traced back to a water pump on Broad Street by physician John Snow.


Memorial to the 52 people who lost their lives in the July 7th bombings in London in 2005.


This hunting lodge was built in 1543 for King Henry VIII and was intended as a grandstand for guests viewing the royal hunt.


A modern reconstruction of the original Globe Theatre on the South bank of the River Thames.


The Bloody Tower is a World Heritage Site which was originally created by William the Conqueror in the early 1080s and was subsequently developed by successive monarchs over the centuries.


Greenwich is the oldest of the Royal Parks and features the Wilderness Deer Park, Flower Garden Lake, Rose Garden and Herb Garden. There are free concerts at the bandstand in the summer.


Grade II listed building housing exhibitions about the history of Greenwich.


A 19th century cemetery containing some very interesting buildings, tombs and memorials.


The buildings date from the 17th century and were designed by Sir Christopher Wren who also designed St Pauls Cathedral.


A grand statue and memorial garden commemorating the death of Queen Victoria located in front of Buckingham Palace.


Eight acres of gardens, with a lake, conservatory, meadow and arboretum.


This is the pedestrian crossing where the iconic photo of the Beatles was taken for their Abbey Road album cover in 1969.


Opened in 1871 this Grade I listed building is a venue for concerts and exhibitions.


Woods containing the remains of Lesnes Abbey founded in the 12th century


This fountain is a memorial to Diana, Princess of Wales and was opened in 2004.


A 2000 year old roman amphitheatre unearthed beneath the Guildhall in 1988.


Buckingham Palace is the official residence of the monarch and has been since 1837.


In one of the perhaps stranger sights to see in Trafalgar Square is the set of plaques installed to demonstrate the imperial units of measurement.


All Hallows is the oldest church in the City of London. It houses a museum in the crypt and offers free guided tours.


There has been a dock yard on this site for over 1000 years. It is now used by luxury yachts and historic barges.


Fulham Palace is the historic residence of the Bishops of London.


Once the wool staple then one of the Inns of the Chancery, this Tudor building looks very much like it would have done when built in the 16th century.


St Mary Le Bow was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666 before being rebuilt by Sir Christopher Wren. The definition of a cockney is someone born within earshot of the Bow Bells, which refers to the bells of this church.


Gallery showing a programme of contemporary art exhibitions within the grade I listed Pitzhanger Manor house.


The Goldsmiths Hall was opened in 1835 and is now open to the public when exhibitions are running.


Museum and Library displaying and documenting an extensive range of items relating to Freemasonry.


This museum of local history occupies four historic buildings: the Tithe Barn, the Granery, the Small Barn and Headstone Manor a Grade I listed, moated manor house.


Henry VIII was famous for a lot of things, but one of his lesser known exploits was his adoption of Whitehall after kicking Cardinal Wolsey, the previous tennant, out. Henry VIII constructed a huge wine cellar in 1536 to stock wine delivered from France.


Beautiful cemetery opened in 1840 regarded as one of the finest Victorian cemetries in the country.


A large park with historic buildings, formal gardens, lakes, 2 play areas and a network of tree lined paths.


The home of designer, artist and craftsman Frank Dickinson. This Grade II listed house was built and furnished by Dickinson between 1902 and 1904.


This museum is the place to go to find out about human history and culture from all over the world.


Visitors can watch debates taking place in the House of Commons and the House of Lords from the public galleries.


The Monument was built in 1671-77 to commemorate the Great Fire of London in 1666.


Designed by Sir Christopher Wren, the Royal Hospital was built by King Charles in 1692 to care for soldiers. Parts of the buildings were heavily damaged in the First World War and by a V2 rocket in 1945.


The former home of the writer and philosopher L Ron Hubbard. It is open to the public by appointment only.


Built in 1912 the arch was commissioned by King Edward VII in Memory of Queen Victoria and is a Grade 1 listed building.


Big Ben is the popular name of the Elizabeth Tower that houses the Great Bell which has the nickname of Big Ben.


One of Londons most famous landmarks, the Abbey has been the church used for coronations since 1066 and is the last resting place of 17 kings and queens.


St Saviours church became Southwark Cathedral in 1905. It holds 5 services each day and one of its bells weighing at 48cwt is in the top ten heaviest change ringing bells in existance.


The Palace of Westminster, more commonly known as the Houses of Parliament are free to view if you are a registered voter in the UK. Both houses (Commons and Lords) have free guided tours available, but you must arrange it in advance with your local MP. The Palace itself can of course can be viewed from the outside whether or not you're a registered voter. The building is listed as a UNESCO world heritage site and was originally built in the 1100's, fires destroyed what once stood on the site, but rebuilding it into what is there today was completed in spectacular fashion. This building has witnessed many historic events that occured here, from Guy Fawkes' gunpowder plot in 1605 right through to the protests and demonstrations of the present day that occur around the Palace. Still one of the most influential political buildings in the world, the Houses of Parliament are well worth seeing on a day out and whether you go in or not, you won't have to spend any money for the pleasure of doing so.

Follow the Map link below to see all historic sites on an easy to use map of London. Do check their web site before you visit as you may find that they are having a special event or exhibition. You can find a link to their web site on our detailed information page.