Free Places To Visit In London

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Top London Days Out provides details of free things to do in London.

For London visitors wondering what to do in London we have many suggestions for cheap London sightseeing and places to visit in London.

The majority of London attractions listed are free to visit and include London art galleries, London Zoos (petting), London events, London museums, London parks, the Royal Parks and many other London attractions.

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The City of London has plenty of things to see and do, but so much of it's history can be seen just by seeking out some of the landmarks that commemorate significant events throughout the timeline of the city.

There are also numerous more recent landmarks such as the Shard, The BT Tower (still referred to as The Post Office Tower) and Battersea Power Station. It would be difficult for you to go far on a walk without seeing one of it's many famous landmarks.


Buckingham Palace is the official residence of the monarch and has been since 1837.


The current building was built in 1907 but there has been a court on the site since medieval times.


Trafalgar Square hosts annual Christmas carol evenings under a massive Christmas Tree in the center of the square. Thousands of people head there to get involved in the Christmas spirit, in one of London's biggest festive get togethers.


The famous sculptor Henry Moore has one of his sculptures ? 'Two Piece Reclining Figure No.3' displayed in Brandon Estate on Cooks Road in Kennington.


Unveiled on 18 September 2005 this is a memorial to British forces who took part in the Battle of Britain.


Jeremy Bentham is one of England's best known philosophers, living between 1748 and 1832. Prior to his death, Bentham had wanted his auto-icon to use his real head, however complications with the mummification of his body did not allow this.


Bunhill Fields is a former burial ground in the Borough of Islington and is now a public garden. Over 2,000 monuments remain to those who are buried here, most notably Daniel Defoe, author of 'Robinson Crusoe' and the poet William Blake.


St Saviours church became Southwark Cathedral in 1905. It holds 5 services each day and one of its bells weighing at 48cwt is in the top ten heaviest change ringing bells in existance.


Footbridge over the river Thames giving great views of St Pauls Cathedral, the Tate Modern Art Gallery and Shakespeares Globe Theatre.


The Goldsmiths Hall was opened in 1835 and is now open to the public when exhibitions are running.


This is where the majority of London film premieres are held. There are 4 major cinemas in the square.


World famous for boutique fashion shops and the centre of the swinging London of the 1960s.


There has been a dock yard on this site for over 1000 years. It is now used by luxury yachts and historic barges.


Originally installed to allow police to keep an eye on protests, the southeast corner of Trafalgar Square houses what many call the world?s smallest police station.


Many London pubs have free live music nights, including the Unicorn in Camden, which has free music most nights of the week. If you like your music loud and heavy, the Unicorn is the place to go.


St Marylebone Parish Church is an Anglican church on Marylebone Road in London. Having had a church on site since around 1200, the current church is the fourth to be built on the site.


Major art gallery housing the largest collection of British art in the world in a grade II listed building.


One of the oldest churches in London, it was destroyed by the Great Fire of London in 1666 and rebuilt, the new design being by Sir Christopher Wren.


Buckingham Palace is the official residence of the monarch and has been since 1837.


This fountain is a memorial to Diana, Princess of Wales and was opened in 2004.


Multi-arts and conference centre with a variety of events and exhibitions some of which are free to attend. It is the largest performing arts centre of its type in Europe.


Leinster Gardens in Bayswater is certainly one of the stranger things to be found in London. The houses at numbers 23 and 24 are fake houses, built at the time of a steam powered underground railway in the 1860's.


The original Cenotaph was a temporary structure erected after the conclusion of the first world war but such was the public feeling for the monument it was replaced by a permenant memorial.


Beautiful cemetery opened in 1840 regarded as one of the finest Victorian cemetries in the country.


The Monument was built in 1671-77 to commemorate the Great Fire of London in 1666.


For any planespotter, Mertyl Avenue is the place to go. Directly under the landing flightpath at Heathrow Airport, spotters can find themselves up close with giant airliners coming into London.


Erected in 1840-3 as a memorial to Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson who died at the battle of Trafalgar in 1805


The current building was built in 1907 but there has been a court on the site since medieval times.


A modern reconstruction of the original Globe Theatre on the South bank of the River Thames.


Designed by Sir Christopher Wren, St Pauls Cathedral is one of the best know buildings in London. It was built after the great fire of London and is at least the fourth Cathedral to stand on this site.


Playground based around a huge wooden pirate ship. Opened in the year 2000 in memory of Diana, Princess of Wales.


Built in 1912 the arch was commissioned by King Edward VII in Memory of Queen Victoria and is a Grade 1 listed building.


Still known by many as The Post Office Tower this is one of Londons tallest buildings and has been a telecommunications centre since the 1960s.


This famous London landmark was closed in 1983 and is now protected by Grade 2 listing by English Heritage.


Market and shopping district famous for street entertainers where you can enjoy shopping, theatre, restaurants and bars in a historical setting.


Opened in 1982, the Thames Barrier provides flood defences for the city of London. Costing ?16,000 to close the flood barrier each time, it has been closed 175 times up to April 2015.


A three storey Jacobean Manor House, built in 1623 and situated in parkland.


A grand statue and memorial garden commemorating the death of Queen Victoria located in front of Buckingham Palace.


One of the most famous sites in London, this twin bascule bridge was built in 1892.


The biggest toy shop in the world, Hamleys has seven floors of toys and games to browse through.


Opened on 31st December in 1999 as the Millennium Dome, the O2 Arena is now a vast entertainment complex. Entrance to the complex is free.


The Gallery contains the national collection of Western European paintings dating from 1200 to 1800.


Famous busy junction with neon and video signs and a statue of Eros and fountain.


Huge ferris wheel standing 135 meters tall on the South Bank of the Thames.


This is the pedestrian crossing where the iconic photo of the Beatles was taken for their Abbey Road album cover in 1969.


In one of the perhaps stranger sights to see in Trafalgar Square is the set of plaques installed to demonstrate the imperial units of measurement.


Longplayer is a piece of music that is 1,000 years long, and has been playing since January 1st 2000, and will restart on 31 December 2999. It is based on a computer algorithm which allows the music to be played without repetition for such a long time.


London Bridge - not all that interesting in itself but you get fantastic views of the Shard, Tower Bridge, HMS Belfast and other great landmarks from here.


Constructed in 1841, the plinth was empty for 150 years having originally been intended for an equestrian statue.


When finished in 1995 this was the largest Hindu temple outside India.


Opened in 1951 the Royal Festival Hall is the main performance venue in the Southbank Centre.


You can access the British Library for researching over 150 million items or to visit one of the free events or exhibitions.


All Hallows is the oldest church in the City of London. It houses a museum in the crypt and offers free guided tours.


This is one of the Royal Residences and a historical building originally purchased by William and Mary in 1689.


The Peace Pagoda is located in Battersea Park on the South bank of the River Thames. It was completed in 1985.


Designed by Sir Norman Foster this huge office block is 180m high.


Visitors can watch debates taking place in the House of Commons and the House of Lords from the public galleries.


In 1854 a severe outbreak of cholera occurred in Soho. The disease, which was previously thought to be air-borne, was traced back to a water pump on Broad Street by physician John Snow.


Ordnance Survey maps are based around the cannons located in Roy Grove, Hampton, and on the Northern Perimeter Road by Heathrow Airport five miles away.


Chancery Lane is home to the London Silver Vaults. Opened in 1876, the Vaults were originally provided as a place to story household silver and jewellery.


The Changing of the Guard happens here everyday in the summer at 11am (10am on Sundays) - on alternate days in the winter.


There aren't many ways to travel underneath the Thames on foot, but the Greenwich Foot Tunnel is one such way. Officially included as part of the National Cycle Route 1 running from Inverness to Dover.


The Bloody Tower is a World Heritage Site which was originally created by William the Conqueror in the early 1080s and was subsequently developed by successive monarchs over the centuries.


Once the wool staple then one of the Inns of the Chancery, this Tudor building looks very much like it would have done when built in the 16th century.


Opened in 1871 this Grade I listed building is a venue for concerts and exhibitions.


St Mary Le Bow was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666 before being rebuilt by Sir Christopher Wren. The definition of a cockney is someone born within earshot of the Bow Bells, which refers to the bells of this church.


Designed by Sir Christopher Wren, the Royal Hospital was built by King Charles in 1692 to care for soldiers. Parts of the buildings were heavily damaged in the First World War and by a V2 rocket in 1945.


Statue of Winston Churchill and Franklin D Roosevelt in conversation on a bench outside Bonhams.


The Business Design Centre in Islington is host to a number of free exhibitions across the year, although not all of them are free. For more details as well as information on upcoming events


Unmissable museum of the natural world for the young and old alike. There are millions of exhibits including the massive diplodocus cast in the central hall.


The tallest building in Western Europe located at London Bridge station but visible for many miles around.


The Temple Church was built by the Knights Templar during the 12th Century, during the reign of King John. The building contains stone effigies from the 13th and 14th centuries, and survived heavy bomb damage in World War II.


The ancient Egyptian obelisk of Cleopatra's Needle is one of one of four of it's kind around the world, with two of the others in New York and Paris, whilst the fourth of the family remains in it's home nation of Egypt. Dating to almost 3,000 years old, the needle was brought to the London to commemorate Lord Nelson's victory at the Battle of the Nile and Sir Ralph Abercromby's victory at the Battle of Alexandria in the 1800's. At around 21 metres tall, the needle is one of the finest examples of ancient architecture you will find and one of the few that you can find outside of a museum worldwide. If you look at its base you can see damage from a World War One bomb.

Trafalgar Square houses one of the most instantly recognisable landmarks in Nelson's Column. Built to commemorate the admiral's successes in naval battles, the plaque at the base of the column was cast from captured French guns. Standing at a height of 170 feet, Lord Nelson has a watchful eye over the bustling Trafalgar Square and is guarded by four intricately sculpted lions, giving a real sense of just how important Nelson was and still is in British history, and why he was chosen to be immortalised on the column in the centre of the capital of the nation that he fought for.

Follow the Map link below to see all landmarks on an easy to use map of London. Do check their web site before you visit as you may find that they are having a special event or exhibition. You can find a link to their web site on our detailed information page.